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Increasing our daily water intake is urgent as UK and global Heat Health Watch Service warned of this summer’s extreme temperatures.

20 July 2017 1,646 views No Comment
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Water is fundamental to life. According to medical facts, about 70% to 80% of your brain tissue is water. If you are dehydrated, your body and your mind will feel anxious and stressed The Bridge MAG. Image

Water is fundamental to life. According to medical facts, about 70% to 80% of your brain tissue is water. If you are dehydrated, your body and your mind will feel anxious and stressed
The Bridge MAG. Image

Healthcare professionals are urging people in Britain and other countries experiencing hot temperatures this summer to take action to minimise the impact of the heat on their health.

Staying cool, drinking plenty of water to maintain hydration, and avoiding sunburn by covering up or wearing high-factor creams are among the measures people are recommended to take to protect themselves in the face of higher-than-usual summer temperatures. And health experts are warning that vulnerable people with underlying heart and lung conditions, older people, babies and young children are at much greater risk of harm if they fail to take heed of the advice.

As to the question of how crucial regular water consumption is to maintaining healthy exposure to ultraviolet radiation, a World Health Organisation spokesperson explains: “Water is essential for life. Safe water supplies, hygienic sanitation and good water management are fundamental to global health.”

In a stark illustration of the risks faced by people living in some of the world’s poorest countries each day, he adds: “Almost one tenth of the global disease burden could be prevented by increasing access to safe drinking water.”

Kaiser Permanente nephrologist Steven Guest agrees, explaining: “Fluid losses occur continuously from skin evaporation, breathing, urine and stool. These losses must be replaced daily for good health.”

From a global point of view, guaranteeing access for everyone to drinkable water should be perceived as being in the enlightened self-interest of mankind generally.  The Bridge MAG. Image

From a global point of view, guaranteeing access for everyone to drinkable water should be perceived as being in the enlightened self-interest of mankind generally.
The Bridge MAG. Image

Water is fundamental to life: everyone deserves clean water

In 2010, the United Nations General Assembly explicitly recognized the human right to safe, clean, plentiful water and sanitation. It argued that water was central for public health – whether used for drinking, cooking, bathing, food production or recreational purposes.

It is little surprise, perhaps, that pledges to use international aid budgets to provide clean water supplies for Africa, South America and the world’s remotest regions have been used for years by politicians’ spin-doctors for their own electoral purposes. Clean water-related projects often tend to capture media and public attention – reliant, as they so often are, on posters of drained, cadaverous mothers and children desperate to quench their thirst. All too often they have also been used by charities and non-government organisations (NGOs) for their own publicity purposes

Health benefits of drinking water are undeniable

Useful facts

  • The human body contains about 80% water
  • Drinking water makes up 85% of blood
  • Removes waste
  • Accounts for 22% of bones
  • Cushions joints
  • Makes 75% of muscle
  • Helps body absorb nutrient
  • Help convert food into energy
  • Moistens oxygen for breathing.

They are a myriad of benefits of water.

Drinking water, either plain or in the form of juice or other beverages, is essential to your health.

Water has become the second most popular drink after soft drinks. According to a new report there are a myriad of reasons to drink water.

The seven wonders of water

1 ) Get slimmer with Water

Are you trying to lose weight? Water revs up your metabolism and helps you feel full, so you don’t constantly find yourself craving unhealthy snacks.

Replace calorie-filled beverages with water, and drink a glass before meals to help you feel fuller.

Drinking more water helps amp up metabolism – especially if your glass is ice cold. Your body will then burn fewer extra calories while working to warm the water up. 

2) Water increases your Energy

Dehydration causes tiredness: if you are feeling drained and exhausted, drink water. The right amount of water will help your heart pump your blood more effectively.

Water improves blood transport, oxygen and other essential nutrients to your cells.

3) Water reduces stress.

According to medical facts, about 70% to 80% of your brain tissue is water. If you are dehydrated, your body and your mind will feel anxious and stressed. Drink as frequently as you can throughout the day.

4) Water builds muscle tone.

Drinking water lubricates joints in the body. A good hydration gives more strength

5) Water nourish your skin

Drinking water hydrates skin cells and plumps them up – making your face look younger. Fine lines and wrinkles are more likely to get deeper when you are dehydrated.

Water also flushes out impurities and improves circulation and blood flow, rejuvenating your skin and making it glow.

6) Keep a regular digestion with water.

Water facilitates good digestion: it helps dissolve waste particles and passes them smoothly through your digestive tract.

When you are dehydrated, your body absorbs all the water, leaving your colon dry and unable to digest and pass waste.

7) Drinking Water Helps Prevent Kidney Stones

For all of us as individuals, trading at least some of our daily or weekly intake of soft drinks or alcohol for a bottle of water is one small, but worthwhile, step towards improving our health and wellbeing.  The Bridge MAG. Image

For all of us as individuals, trading at least some of our daily or weekly intake of soft drinks or alcohol for a bottle of water is one small, but worthwhile, step towards improving our health and wellbeing.
The Bridge MAG. Image

The rate of kidney stone diagnosis has surged in the last decade. It is believed that kidney stones will affect one in 10 adults at some point during their lives – usually between the ages of 20 and 50.

Kidney stones are masses of minerals such as calcium and oxalate that become grabbed in your urinary tract. If the stone is large enough to cause irritation or blockage, severe pain will typically result.

The first risk factor for kidney stones is not drinking enough water. Those who are not drinking enough will tend to have higher concentrations of waste produce in their urine, which causes the stones.

According to the results of a large meta-analysis, presented recently by The National Kidney Foundation meeting in Dallas, Texas, people who produced 2 to 2.5 litres of urine daily were 50 per cent less likely to develop kidneys stones than those who produced less.

Last year, new guidelines issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) called for people who have had a kidney stone in the past to increase their water intake to least two litres. This could decrease stone recurrence by at least half.

Are you drinking enough water?

The exact amount you need depends on your size, level of activity, the weather, and your general health.

You may need more water if you exercise or sweat heavily. 

The value of human hydration is undeniable and crucial. Dehydration alters health, wellbeing and performance, as well as impacting to morbidity in several chronic disease processes. From a global point of view, then, guaranteeing access for everyone to drinkable water should be perceived as being in the enlightened self-interest of mankind generally. For all of us as individuals, meanwhile, trading at least some of our daily or weekly intake of soft drinks or alcohol for a bottle of water is one small, but worthwhile, step towards improving our health and wellbeing.

 

The editor

Rachel Tcheungna

 

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