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Caucasian Autumn: Autumn 2015, the debacle; The “Arab Spring” is coming back home. Is this the “Caucasian Autumn”?

20 September 2015 3,248 views No Comment
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Migrant crisis in Europe and worldwide is one of the most unpredictable twists of the “Arab Spring” and the permanent Afghan, DRC and other national conflicts. The Bridge MAG. Image

Migrant crisis in Europe and worldwide is one of the most unpredictable twists of the “Arab Spring” and the permanent Afghan, DRC and other national conflicts. The Bridge MAG. Image

Flying from Tunisia to Afghanistan, via Sudan, and other countries torn apart by war, the western military plane has now landed back swamped with refugees.

The migrant crisis in Europe is making the UK and the world’s headlines: pictures of children’s corpses dumped ashore and families desperate to cross European borders have become the media-dominating images, but very little has been said about the source of the disaster. 

The refugee Diaspora can be traced back since the First World War. In his article entitled ‘The ‘Arab Spring’ and the West: Seven Lessons from History’, Seumas Milne  writes:

‘The Middle East has never been fully decolonised. Carved into artificial states after the First World War, it’s been bombed and occupied – by the US, Israel, Britain and France – and locked down with US bases and Western-backed tyrannies.  The Arab world has been the target of continual interference and intervention ever since it became formally independent’.

Seumas Milne is a British journalist and writer known for his left-wing views: a columnist and associate editor at The Guardian newspaper.

The Arab uprisings that erupted in Tunisia a few years ago have focused on corruption, poverty and lack of freedom, rather than Western domination or Israeli occupation.

  • Why should Western foreign policy worldwide be viewed as failure?

Darker still are the shadowy workings of global capitalism; in particular, the armaments trade, which profits from war.

As John Pilger said prophetically only a few months ago in the New Statesman:

The only way to prevent thousands of refugees being forced from their home countries is for Western powers to stop meddling in those countries’ affairs. The Bridge MAG. Image

The only way to prevent thousands of refugees being forced from their home countries is for Western powers to stop meddling in those countries’ affairs.
The Bridge MAG. Image

‘The uprising in Egypt is our theatre of the possible. Fear of Lord-knows-what requires that the historical truth of US and British ‘diplomacy’ as largely responsible for the suffering in the Middle East be suppressed or reversed. …Forget the secret Anglo-American sponsorship of jihadists as a “bulwark” against democratic control of oil.’

The same goes with war for oil and other mineral resources in Afghanistan (remember Kabul), Iraq (remember the alleged “Weapons of Mass Destruction”), Libya, Syria, the Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and many other countries besieged by conflicts and misery.

However, European and American populations as a whole have nothing to do with this mess. Only a handful of unscrupulous politicians eager to control and rule the world by all means should be hold accountable.

In his article entitled ‘The Betrayal of Afghanistan’, John Pilger depicts America’s greed and evilness as followed:

Europe should urge their politicians to stop interfering in other governments’ home and foreign policies in the name of “democracy”. The Bridge MAG. Image

Europe should urge their politicians to stop interfering in other governments’ home and foreign policies in the name of “democracy”. The Bridge MAG. Image

‘The American goal was the realisation of a 60-year “dream” of building a pipeline from the former Soviet Caspian across Afghanistan to a deep-water port. The Taliban were offered 15 cents for every 1,000 cubic feet of gas that passed through Afghanistan. Although these were the Clinton years, pushing the deal were the “oil and gas junta” that was soon to dominate George W Bush’s regime. Peel the onion of this and you find Bush senior as a paid consultant of the huge Carlyle Group, whose 164 companies specialise in oil and gas and pipelines and weapons. His clients included a super-wealthy Saudi family, the Bin Ladens. (Within days of the September 11 attacks, the Bin Laden family was allowed to leave the US in high secrecy).

The pipeline “dream” faded when two US embassies in East Africa were bombed and al-Qaida was blamed and the connection with Afghanistan was made. The usefulness of the Taliban was over; they had become an embarrassment and expendable. ..Today, with Afghanistan “liberated”, the pipeline is finally going ahead, watched over by the US ambassador to Afghanistan, John J Maresca, formerly of Unocal.’

John Pilger is arguably the most outspoken and uncompromising journalist of his generation.

According to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), recent statistics  since the start of this year show over 320,000 people have crossed the Mediterranean, undertaking treacherous journeys from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan and other countries torn apart by war, persecution, and a horrifying list of human miseries.

  • Migrant crisis in Europe and worldwide is one of the most unpredictable twists of the “Arab Spring” and the permanent Afghan, DRC and other national conflicts.

The refugee’s crisis in Europe is only the natural consequence of hundreds of thousands of children and adult civilians from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan, and other countries forced out of their home countries by war and persecution.

Let us keep the equation short and simple: no wars, no refugees. The Bridge MAG. Image

Let us keep the equation short and simple: no wars, no refugees. The Bridge MAG. Image

Let us keep the equation short and simple: no wars, no refugees.

Protecting refugees and providing lifesaving assistance such as shelter, food and water as they arrive across Europe is not enough. Europe should urge their politicians to stop interfering in other governments’ home and foreign policies in the name of “democracy”.

The only way to prevent thousands of refugees being forced from their home countries is for Western powers to stop meddling in those countries’ affairs.

Humanity has, through its own ingenuity, achieved huge advances in living standards in recent decades. Yet at the same time, we have yet to successfully prevent the wars that are waged over the question of who controls those countries’ natural and mineral resources. For us in the West to stand by and just watch this global rape of resources and destruction of innocents leaves us all in some sense responsible for the continued suffering of children and families throughout the world caught up in those war-zones.

At a time when the world is witnessing a globalisation of refugee crises, it is about raising awareness among populations, regardless of their geographical locations, that mass migration is a consequence of war and conflict, products of global capitalism.

We are living in an age of discipline, culture and civilisation, but our ethical development could take centuries to catch up.

The world is in a permanent climate of insecurity, terror, war and migration.  Unregulated greed and selfishness have taken their toll on 21st century humanity.

If there is one abiding metaphor that best sums up our predicament as humans, it is surely that we all inhabit the same boat of the human race; and the boat will hit the iceberg if governments and civilians cannot see beyond the greed of wars.

If international capitalism is dependent on perpetuating global conflicts in order to sustain its economic productivity, then it has not only completely lost its moral compass, but has also lost its right to continue in its current form.

We can only conclude that if the accumulation of assets such as oil, gas or mineral resources involves the bombing of innocent civilians, their schools and hospitals, as well as mass migration, then surely a reassessment of our worldviews is long overdue.

The editor,

Rachel Tcheungna

 

 

 

 

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